EVOO

Extra Virgin Olive Oil has been a press-whore in the past few years. 

  • Rachaeal Ray cleverly refers to it as “E-V-O-O”, a catchphrase which is now officially listed in the Oxford American Dictionary
  • Dr Oz promotes it as a healthy fat and recommends eating one slice of whole wheat bread lightly drizzled in EVOO prior to dinner every night to curbe over-eating
  •  Olive Oil tours are the new wine tours, with foodies taste-testing their way across Spain and Italy

EVOO is also one of the best-kept beauty secrets.  It’s an all-natural hypoallergenic product that sooths, moisturizes, and repairs our skin.  It contains antioxidents which heals damaged skin, and is rich with emollients which assist the skin’s ability to retain moisture.  Commerical mositurizers contain complex chemical agents to create emollients, however emollients are naturally-ocurring in EVOO making it a pure and simple method of hydrating the skin and locking in moisture.

In researching the vast benefits of epsom salts, I recalled reading that soap interferes with the actions of the salts.  I typically add epsom salts to all my bubble baths as the salts are scent-free and I need the aroma from the bubble baths to to fully enjoy my de-stressing soaks. 

So this is something I need to further investigate, but after completing my half-marathon this past weekend, I wasn’t about to take any chances that epsom salts wouldn’t work their wonders on my sad sore muscles.  I couldn’t risk adding any form of soap, but epsom salts on their own are just so boring.  Enter EVOO.

I added a generous amout of EVOO to running bath water (perhaps 2 to 3 tbsp) along with 4 scoops of epsom salts (see scoop inside apothacary jar in photo). 

Immediately the oil separated into small clusters and floated on top of the bath water.  I gave it a quick swirl with my arm and hopped in.  Ok I didn’t hop in.  Firstly, that was impossible as a result of running for over 2 hours.  Secondly, the bath floor was slick from the addition of EVOO so hopping in would have surely resulted in several broken bones.  Where was I?  Right.

As I entered the tub the water felt thick and greasy.  Then I was hit by the strong aroma of salad dressing.  Not so good on the senses.

However as I rested and recovered, I actually grew to enjoy the oily water as it immediatly coated my skin in a gorgeous soft oily embrace.  Wayyy better than any bath product I own.  And slightly better than the Johnson’s Baby Oil I frequently use.  To remind myself that I was relaxing in a bath and not cooking in the kitchen, I lit a lavender-vanilla candle

I enjoyed a well-deserved 20 minutes of muscle recovery, then reluctantly exited the tub as my Running Partner had a bottle of champagne chilling at her house that was calling my name.

After drying myself with my huge fluffly towel, my skin felt like I had just liberally applied a body butter.  There was a very very slight greasiness, but not uncomfortable or annoying.  I don’t think my skin has ever felt so moisturized.  And this is soley from the few tablespoons of EVOO in the tub – I did not apply anything to my skin afterwards.

EVOO will be my new bath buddy.  Not always, as I do love me some bubbles and aromatherapy.  I can see using it with epsom salts in the tub, applying it as a mositurizor (especially after exfoliating), and perhaps mixing it WITH epsom salts to exfloliate.

The only drawback is the scent (while not offensive – it just smells like EVOO, but not quite soothing and relaxing), and the residue it leaves in the tub.  The next day every single bit of dust in my house found it’s way to my ensuite and settled on the inside of my tub.  And a few drops of oil remained in the tub after draining, which my hubby mistook for cat pee.

I recommend adding a few drops of essenetial oils to create a lovely scent or light a candle like I did.  And as for the residue it leaves – you’ll have to do a quick clean up as the water drains.  Ya that sucks.   But trust me – your skin will thank you for pampering it with EVOO. 

 

 

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